Mission

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Narrative - Official Air Force Mission Description

Mission 250: 504 B-17s and 226 B-24s are dispatched to hit industrial areas in the suburbs of Berlin; fierce fighter opposition claims 69 bombers (the highest number lost by the Eighth Air Force in a single day) and 11 fighters; the bombers claim 97-28-60 Luftwaffe fighters; details are:

1. 248 B-17s hit secondary targets in the Berlin area; 18 B-17s are lost, 2 damaged beyond repair and 172 damaged; casualties are 2 KIA, 8 WIA and 184 MIA.

2. 226 B-17s hit targets of opportunity at Templin, Verden, Kalkeberge, Potsdam, Oranienburg and Wittenberg; 35 B-17s are lost, 3 damaged beyond repair and 121 damaged; casualties are 15 WIA and 354 MIA.

3. 198 B-24s hit the primary target (Genshagen industrial area), secondary targets in the Berlin area and targets of opportunity at Potsdam; 16 B-24s are lost, 1 damaged beyond repair and 54 damaged; casualties are 15 KIA, 8 WIA and 148 MIA.

Escort is provided by 86 P-38s, 615 Eighth and Ninth Air Force P-47s and 100 Eighth and Ninth Air Force P-51s; results are:

1. P-38s claim 3-0-1 Luftwaffe aircraft; 1 P-38 is lost, the pilot is MIA.

2. P-47s claim 36-7-12 Luftwaffe aircraft; 5 P-47s are lost, 3 damaged beyond repair and 4 damaged; casualties are 2 WIA and 5 MIA.

3. P-51s claim 43-1-20 Luftwaffe aircraft; 5 P-51s are lost and 2 damaged; casualties are 5 MIA. The fighters also claim 1-0-12 Luftwaffe aircraft on the ground. Mission 251: 5 of 5 B-17s drop 250 bundles of leaflets on Nantes, Cambrai, Lille, Chateauroux and Lorient, France at 2029-2130 hours without loss.

CARPETBAGGER missions are also flown.

A detachment of 22d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 7th Photographic Group (Reconnaissance), ceases operating from Attlebridge and returns to base at Mount Farm, England with F-5s.

Source: THE ARMY AIR FORCES IN WORLD WAR II: COMBAT CHRONOLOGY, 1941-1945 by Carter / Mueller, the Office of Air Force History,

Mission Reports

100th BG Mission Report - B-17 crashed near a farm in the village Elsten near Cloppenburg.source: Army Air Forces Online Forum http://forum.armyairforces.com/
303BG Mission Report - Target: City Area, Berlin, Germany (PFF). Crews Dispatched: 27 (358BS - 5, 359th - 7, 360th - 7, 427th - 8). Crew Members Lost or Wounded: 2 crewmen wounded. Length of Mission: 8 hours, 40 minutes. Bomb Load: 10 x 500 lb G.P.; 42 M47A1 Incendiary bombs. Bombing Altitudes: 20,800 ft; 22,000 ft. Ammo Fired: 10,645 rounds.

Berlin was again the target and the entire 1st Bomb Division bombed in the first large-scale daylight attack against the German capital. Twenty-seven 303rd BG(H) aircraft were airborne and dispatched. 26 B-17s dropped 50 tons of 500-lb. G.P. M43 bombs in a suburban area about six miles east of the heart of Berlin. The M47A1 65-lb. incendiary bombs of the High Group, in which the 360BS was Low Squadron, covered six blocks of a residential area. Bombing was done from 19,800 and 22,000 feet by PFF. The 8th Air Force dropped more than one million leaflets over Berlin.

There were 2/10 to 5/10 cloud cover over the entire route to the target. Flak was very intense and accurate. Ground rockets were reported at various points. Eighteen aircraft suffered minor damage and five suffered major damage from anti-aircraft fire. No chaff was carried. Briefing officers predicted the heaviest concentration of enemy fighters on any mission so far flown. This prediction proved accurate as vicious enemy fighter attacks were experienced. The 303rd BG(H) crews reported 40 to 50 enemy aircraft with two direct attacks: one by 8 to 10 ME-109s and FW-190s, and the other by eight ME-109s damaging two 303rd BG(H) aircraft.

More info on this mission at the 303BG website

source: 303rd Bomb Group web page http://www.303rdbg.com/
306BG Mission Reportsource: 306th Bombardment Group website www.306bg.org/
351BG Mission Report - 20 aircraft were sent on this mission. source: 351st Bomb Group web page http://www.351st.org/ken.harbour
384BG Mission Report - 384th BG Mission Number 72. Primary Target: Ball-Bearing Plant - Berlin, Germany. Target Attacked : Primary (Visual).

25 aircraft assigned to this mission: Completed Mission - 5. Aborted - 19. Scrubbed - 1

source: 384th Bomb Group web page http://384thBombGroup.com/
388BG Mission Report - For this mission, the 388th furnished the "A" Group and the lead and low squadrons of the "B" Group. The 452nd Bomb Group furnished the high squadron of the "B" Group. These were the lead and low Groups in the 45th Combat Wing which was the last Wing in the 3rd Division formation. The 1st Air Division was the first over the target. Our assign target was the Robert Bosch Electrical Factory in the Southwestern section of Berlin.

12 a/c of the "B" Group were airborne by 0801 hours followed by 21 a/c of the "A" Group by 0824 hours. 2 a/c of the "B" and 5 a/c of the "A" Group aborted for mechanical reasons. Group formations were effected without difficulty and when headed for the target, the lead a/c of the "A" Group aborted. At this time, the "B" Group took over the lead. The briefed route was followed until the formation reached the vicinity of Berlin. Instead of attacking the assigned target, the formation circled the outskirts of the city with the "B" Group bombing Cranienburg on the Northern outskirts of Berlin. Bombs were away at 1347 hours from 20,000 feet. The "A" Group which followed the "B" Group around Berlin, did not drop its bombs on this target. They instead, bombed Wittenberg on the Northwest side of Berlin at 1407 hours from 19,400 feet.

Strike photos show that the bombs from the "B" Group hit in the residential section near the marshalling yards and the Heinkel Aircraft Plant. Strike photos show that the bombs from the "A" Group were in the center of the factory area of a priority textile works on the banks of the Elbe River. From the target, the formation proceeded to make good the briefed course on the return route.

Approximately 15 to 20 FW 190's were met on the route to the target near Dummer Lake. The attacks lasted 20 minutes and were mainly directed at the Groups ahead. Lt. Sol-data when hit by fighters, lost two engines and was escorted home by a P-47 piloted by Col. Gabresky. No serious enemy fighter attacks took place in the target area but were again encountered in the same area on the return route. At this time, the FW 190's plus several ME 109's pressed home vicious, daring attacks for 30 minutes. It was from these attacks that six of our a/c were lost and a seventh a/c lost when it was hit by a crippled a/c. Encounters were from all directions but mainly from the front. 2 to 6 a/c in a line would also attack from the nose high. Many of the planes that were shot down, went down in flames.

F/0 Dopko had to leave the formation when a prop ran-away on one engine and the supercharger went out on another over Berlin. When the plane left the formation, two enemy a/ c swept in for the kill. The tail-gunner, S/Sgt. Haydon, is credited with driving off the fighters and was wounded.

F/O Dopko dove the plane, "Little Willie" for the deck and started the long trip home. At the lower level, one of the faltering engines came back in, so "Little Willie" had three engines for its low-level tour of Germany. They made it back to Knettishall only to be shot down three days later on another Berlin mission in "Little Willie".

Flak was encountered from Amsterdam, Quakenbruck and Vechta. In the Berlin area it was intense with rockets also from the ground defenses.

Lt. Givens in a/c 42-31135, was hit by "Abbeyville Boys" and went down in flames near Darien, Holland. They were soon captured and taken into the town jail.

On the return route near Quakenbruck, this a/c was hit from underneath by #866 which took part of the left wing and the ball-turret. The plane was on fire and Captain Brown ordered the crew to bail-out. The Navigator and Bombardier were blown out of the nose and the Co-pilot never got his chute on.

source: 388th Bomb Group web page http://www.388bg.info
392nd Bomb Group Mission Reportsource: 392nd Bomb Group web page http://www.b24.net/missions/
401BG / 613BS Mission Report - In an attempt to successfully bomb the target at Erkner, Germany the Groups of the 8th Air Force were again dispatched to that target on 6th March. The 613th furnished 4 crews who flew as the Low Squadron of the Group formation in addition to the Squadron Commander, Major Brown, who flew the lead aircraft of the Group. The following are the crews who participated on this mission: Locher, Scharff, Keith, Livingstone. The weather again prevented the formation from reaching the primary target and resulted in the bombing of Templin, Germany, a target of opportunity. The target was partially obscured and the bombing results were not accurately determined. Enemy fighter opposition was described as being heavy and estimates ranged from 60 to 150 encountered. Attacks were persistent and vicious and as many as 20 enemy aircraft attacked the formation in line abreast. Flak was described as moderate and a few ground rockets were observed. The Squadron suffered no losses from this operation.source: 613th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 614BS Mission Report - For the third time the briefed target was Erkner - and for the third time cloud foiled the 8th Air Force in their attempt to bomb it. But Berlin was found through patchy cloud and the Group bombed Templin. The 24 401st aircraft were led by Lt. Col. E.W. Brown and they made up the Lead Box of the 94th Combat Wing. The enemy fighter attack, as expected, was heavy and the estimates of the numbers ranged from 60 to 150. The attacks were pressed home persistently and these consisted of as many as 20 enemy aircraft in line abreast coming through the formation. Flak was moderate and some of the crews spotted ground rockets coming up into the formation. The only loss during this first attack on Berlin was a 615th ship piloted by 2nd Lt. Claude M. Kolb. Four 614th crews took part on this mission; they were: Smith, Stine, Kirkhuff, Dawes.source: 614th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 615BS Mission Report - This was the day all the 8th Air Force had been waiting for, the attack on the German capital itself - Big B - Berlin, and the flak and fighter attacks were all that was expected of them. Of the 672 four-engined bombers over Berlin 69 were shot down, 6 received Cat. E battle damage and 347 battle of a lower category; 31 crew members were wounded and 17 KIA. In terms of individual crew members it meant that 686 of them were posted as MIA. On top of this there were many aircraft lost as a result of mid-air collisions, ditchings in the sea and crashes of battle damaged aircraft. In return the bombers made claims of 97-28-60 and the fighters 81-8-21. The 615th Squadron lost one aircraft over Berlin, that of Lt. C.M. Kolb and his crew. The Group was briefed at 0445 hrs, with 24 crews, under the command of Lt. Col. E.W. Brown, becoming airborne by 0839 hrs. Lt. Col. A.C. Brooks had taken off in the Group weather ship at 0705 hrs to scout the weather to the coast and report back to the formation leaving Deenethorpe 1.5 hours after him. Erkner was again the primary target but, due again to bad weather, the Group Templin,~NE of Berlin. Bombing was by PFF means and was later interpreted as being excellent. The 401st was Lead Box of the 94th CBW with the 615th flying as Lead Squadron. There were numerous enemy attacks from the target area all the way back home and the number of enemy aircraft was from 60 to 150. The 615th put up the following crews: Knight, Christensen, Lozinski, Kolb (MIA).source: 615th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 612BS Mission Report - Crews: Goodman, Fox, Hagen, West, Kelly, Hersey, Christensen.source: 612th Bombardment Squadron History
44BG Mission Report - BERLIN. The "Big B", in airman's lingo, was the target for today. Specifically, the target was the Ernest Heinkel Assembly Plant at Genshagen, located on the southern outskirts of Berlin. (Lead Bombardier Lt. Carvour remembers the target to be Luckenwalde). The secondary target was the famed Templehof Airdrome near Berlin. Ground fog at take-off time caused some difficulty, but the 67th put up eight aircraft, six of which completed a difficult assembly on time and a long trip which began at 0800 hours. The bomb load of 12 x 500 lb GP. Sgt. Kipnes states, --Take-off at 0805 with Lt. Perry and crew. Just when we got into formation and we were ready to leave the English coast, out tail gunner had an acute appendix attack. Due to the high-altitude he was in terrible pain. Lt. Perry decided to abort and return to base. 'Just before landing I fired two yellow flares (yellow-yellow) which brought the ambulance to our plane just as we rolled to a stop at the head of the runway. While in flight I received a long Bomber Command message in code, changing our return route. - Landed at 1135 hours." Lt. Carvour, lead Bombardier, said that Col. Culbertson was the Command Pilot aboard his ship. They made two passed as the Primary but the heavy undercast prevented dropping bombs. So they turned the formation and headed for Berlin itself. Lt. Carvour lined up a target of opportunity along the river on the south western area, railway lines and industrial area which was visual as the remaining part of Berlin was still undercast. Just as the cross-hair indices was-about to occur, the Command Pilot yelled to abandon target and to hit the now visible Templehof Airdrome. But it was too late as the plane started its turn the bombing mechanism could not be stopped and out went the bombs. Accurate flak was encountered in the target area, but little damage was incurred by our planes. Enemy aircraft were seen but no dttacks were experienced by the 44th Group. Some of our planes dropped bombs on Templehof A/D as well. Templehof was hit with good results, Losses and claims were nil, but there was that feeling of being "over the hump" - the climax had been reached. The only really new and greater climax that could top this one was the INVASION. Although the 44th escaped unscathed, 16 B-24s from other Groups Plus 53 B-17S were lost this day. Major Cameron resumed command of the Squadron.source: 44th Bomb Group web page http://www.8thairforce.com/44thbg
446th Bomb Group Mission Report
Genshagen/Berlin

The first large attack on the German capital by the 8th Air Force, the Zehlendorf area of Berlin was set afire. Flak was so intense that 38 planes suffered damage. One plane, Major Hoopo (42-100288), ditched in the English Channel after repeated attacks by enemy fighters, killing 7 of the 10 crewmen on board. The plane broke in 2 on ditching, and the men were able to get into a dinghy. While a P-47 circled overhead, a rescue craft slowly made its way to them and brought them home.

source: 446th Bomb Group www.446bg.com
457th Bomb Group Mission Linksource: 457 Bomb Group http://www.457thbombgroup.org
458th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 458th Bomb Group web page http://www.458bg.com/
91st BG / 323nd BS Mission Report - Berlin, Germany was again the target, especially Hoppergarten. Seven ships of 323rd squadron took part, two of which aborted. One ship #761, crash-landed at Steeple Morten shortly after take-off. All crew members escaped uninjured, but the ship was so badly damaged that it was considered a complete loss. As there was 10/10ths cloud cover over the target, results of the bombing were not observed; however, photos indicate that the primary target was not hit - the bombs going in the Hoppergarten area. source: 323rd Bomb Squadron / 91BG Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
91st BG / 322nd BS Mission Report - Raid on Hespegarten, Germany. Six 323rd A/C dropped 60 x 500 G.P. bombs at 1315 hours from 21,000 ft. Results were unobserved due to enemy attacks. Meager, accurate A/A fire damaged three 323rd aircraft. E/A were reported to have made very savage attacks on a formation led by the 1st Division. Upwards of 100 E/A were seen, both T/E and S/E fighters. A/C 483, was hit by E/A fire before the target. He stayed with the formation with his #1 engine smoking, and at 1318 hours dropped his bombs and headed down. Five chutes were seen to come from this aircraft. Our casualties were the ten men of Lt. Evertson's crew as missing and S/S Roland B. ''' (A/C 367, Lt. Newquists' crew) was injured in the forehead by glass when flak struck his tail gun position. source: 322rd Bomb Squadron / 91BG Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report - Target: Hoppegarten (Berlin) Ball Bearing Works Clouds covered primary target at Erkner and Lt. Col. Milton, leading the 8 A.F., made the attack th upon Berlin itself - the bombs believed to have fallen in the Hoppegarten area. Up to 100 E/A attacked our group viciously. Fighter escort was excellent except in the target area. Crews praised our fighters who fought recklessly against an overpowering number of E/A in the target area.source: 91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
91BG / 401BS Mission Report - Mission to Hoppergarten, Germany. 3 crews missing in action. The primary target in this case was the ball bearing Works at Erkner, Germany. 10/10 undercast prevented an attack on the primary. Generally unobserved. PFF bombing on what is believed to be Hoppergarten, Germany. As many as E/A 100 reported. Masses of E/F Attacked our formations all at once, presumably in an attempt to overpower the firepower of this Combat Wing. Some instances of rockets being fired at our formation were reported. The escort was very good with the exception of just before the target and just afterwards. Cover over the target was good but our fighters seemed to be heavily outnumbered. En route to the target moderate accurate AA fire was experienced from the vicinities of Lingen, Rheine and Osnabruck. Meager, inaccurate AA fire was reported from the vicinities of Diepholz, Nienburg and Celle. Some crews reported meager and inaccurate AA fire at the target. source: 91st BG / 401st BS Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
92BG Mission Report - Losses: 325th Squadron, a/c B-17G 231503 L. 2#: 326th Squadron, a/c B-17 240052 X. Crew seen to have bailed out. #3: 327th Squadron, a/c B-17 297527 K. Camera ship. A/c seen to explode. #4: a/c B-17 231680 P. Shot down by FW 190. Eight chutes seen. source: 92nd Bomb Group web page http://92ndma.org/
92BG Mission Report - Aircraft of the 92nd Bomb Group flew as lead group and low squadron of 40A Combat Wing. This formation bombed the secondary target on the bombs of leading pff a/c. Friendly fighter support was very much as briefed. There were numerous P-51 a/c in the target area and a few P-38s, P-47s, with some P-51s. Report was constant in and out from the target to the enemy coast. Numerous dogfights were reported, particularly in the vicinity of the target. Four of our a/c are missing from this mission. What is believed to be a/c 527 K was reported hit by flak in the vicinity of 5305N-1300E at about 1333 hours, then to explode and disintegrate into small pieces. No chutes were reported. What is believed to be another B-17 from the 40A Combat Wing, but not otherwise identified, was last seen about 1148 hours in the Dümmer Lake area with two engines smoking, trying to crash land. The a/c was seen to burst into flames on the ground when it struck. No chutes were reported. At 5328N-0830E at 1430 hours a B-17 also claimed to be a/c 527 K of this group, which can only be definitely identified as a B-17 from this group, was observed to receive a direct hit or very near miss from flak and explode. The a/c broke in two and generally disintegrated, the nose and tail sections falling as rather large pieces. No chutes were observed. What is believed to be another B-17 of this group was reported at 1443 hours five miles north of Lingen to be last seen in a controlled descent, heading 285 mag and down to cloud cover, 15,500 feet with all engines turning over, but with one smoking. At 1445 hours when this a/c was almost lost to view one crew reported a flak burst caused the tail section to be blown off. Five free chutes were observed and one open chute was seen to stream from the ball turret and appear snagged.source: 92nd Bomb Group web page http://92ndma.org/

Non-Combat Accident Reports

Aircraft: B-17F (#41-24406*).
Organization: 368BS / 306BG of Thurleigh, Bedfordshire.
Pilot: Smith, Charles W.
Notes: interned.
Location: Isle of Gotland Sweden.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-31567).
Organization: 413BS / 96BG of Snetterton Heath, Norfolk.
Pilot: Kasch, Donald O.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Snetterton Heath, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-37761).
Organization: 323BS / 91BG of Bassingbourn, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: Wilkinson, Walter E.
Notes: crash landing.
Location: Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24J (#42-7473).
Organization: 579BS / 392BG of Wendling, Norfolk.
Pilot: Shea, Paul F.
Notes: killed in crashed on take off.
Location: Wendling, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: F-5C (#42-67113).
Organization: 27PRS / 7PRG of Mount Farm, Oxfordshire.
Pilot: Haugen, Cecil T.
Notes: crash landing engine failure.
Location: Mount Farm, Oxfordshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-74685).
Organization: 369FS / 359FG of East Wretham, Norfolk.
Pilot: Matthew, Harry J.
Notes: take off accident.
Location: East Wretham, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-74729).
Organization: 357FS / 355FG of Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: McFarlane, Walter E.
Notes: mid air collision.
Location: Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-75109).
Organization: 63FS / 56FG of Halesworth, Suffolk.
Pilot: Dale, Sam B Jr.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Halesworth, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-75447).
Organization: 376FS / 361FG of Bottisham, Cambrdigeshire.
Pilot: Feller, Charles H.
Notes: take off accident.
Location: Bottisham, Cambrdigeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 1
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-75574).
Organization: 357FS / 355FG of Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: Butler, Reed B.
Notes: mid air collision.
Location: Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-75575).
Organization: 63FS / 56FG of Halesworth, Suffolk.
Pilot: Wisniewski, Adam J.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Halesworth, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-8446).
Organization: 376FS / 361FG of Bottisham, Cambrdigeshire.
Pilot: .
Notes: take off accident.
Location: Bottisham, Cambrdigeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51B (#43-6427).
Organization: 363FS / 357FG of Leiston, Suffolk.
Pilot: Michaely, William D.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Leiston, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: Spit XI (#MB950).
Organization: 14PRS / 7PRG of Mount Farm, Oxfordshire.
Pilot: Davidson, Verner K.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: RAF Bradwell Bay England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: Spit XI (#PA841).
Organization: 14PRS / 7PRG of Mount Farm, Oxfordshire.
Pilot: Adams, Gerald M.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: RAF Bradwell Bay England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/

Mission Stats (Targets, Aircraft, Casualties, etc.)

Mission "8th AF 250"
Berlin industrial areas
March 06, 1944

Primary source for mission statistics: Mighty Eighth War Diary by Roger A. Freeman
 
Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
7306721648.097-28-600-0-069-6-34717-31-686392BG aircraft crashes take-off
453BG aircraft ditches sea
453BG aircraft ditches sea
448BG aircraft interned Sweden
388BG aircraft interned Sweden
306BG aircraft interned Sweden
100BG aircraft interned Sweden
452BG aircraft crash-lands
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Mission Targets

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ERKNER, GERMANY
Vereinigte Kugellagerfabriken (VKF) Industry
ball bearings100 A/Cphotos (3)
BERLIN, GERMANY
Friedrichstrasse Railroad
station148 A/C
TEMPLIN, GERMANY
Target of Opportunity
226 A/C
GENSHAGEN, GERMANY
Daimler-Benz Industry
engines198 A/C
Aircraft Groups

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
303BG
305BG
306BG
351BG
379BG
381BG
384BG
401BG
457BG
482BG
91BG
92BG
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
44BG
93BG
389BG
392BG
445BG
446BG
448BG
453BG
458BG
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
94BG
100BG
385BG
388BG
390BG
447BG
452BG
95BG
96BG
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
Aircraft Losses

Click blue links for info on the MIA aircraft (if known).
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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
91BG (6 a/c)
92BG (4 a/c)
306BG (1 a/c)
379BG (1 a/c)
381BG (3 a/c)
401BG (1 a/c)
457BG (2 a/c)
457BG (5 a/c)
482BG (1 a/c)
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
93BG (1 a/c)
389BG (1 a/c)
392BG (1 a/c)
445BG (2 a/c)
446BG (1 a/c)
448BG (1 a/c)
453BG (4 a/c)
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
94BG (1 a/c)
95BG (8 a/c)
100BG (15 a/c)
388BG (7 a/c)
390BG (1 a/c)
452BG (2 a/c)
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)