Mission

  • Hover over the yellow column headings for abbreviation information
  • Click Target names to open a new window with MAPS of the target area
  • Use Back button to return to previous 8AF web page

MISSION DETAILS

Choose a Different Date or

Click button to view Mission record sections:

    

Narrative - Official Air Force Mission Description

Mission 938: 1,315 bombers and 905 fighters are dispatched to attack airfields known or suspected to be used by jet aircraft; about 60 jets and a few conventional fighters attack the formations; 19 bombers and 8 fighters are lost; the AAF claims 328-4-249 Luftwaffe aircraft:

1. 442 B-17s are sent to hit the Army HQ munitions depot (278) and airfield (139) at Oranienburg; 11 hit Rechlin Airfield, the secondary; they claim 7-1-8 aircraft; 9 B-17s are lost, 2 damaged beyond repair and 50 damaged; 1 airman is KIA and 84 MIA. Escorting are 273 of 289 P-51s; they claim 11.5-0-8 aircraft in the air and 56-0-32 on the ground; 4 P-51s are lost (pilots MIA).

2. 132 of 144 B-17s hit Neuruppin Airfield; 9 others hit the marshalling yard at Stendal, the secondary; 1 B-17 is lost and 44 damaged. The escort is 112 of 117 P-51s claiming 128-0-94 aircraft on the ground; 1 P-51 is lost (pilot MIA).

3. 372 B-17s are sent to hit the Briest Airfield at Brandenburg (138), and Zerbst (75) and Burg-Bei-Magdeburg (147) Airfields; they claim 10-3-4 aircraft; 8 B-17s are lost, 2 damaged beyond repair and 160 damaged; total losses for forces 2. and 3. are 1 KIA, 7 WIA and 80 MIA. 172 of 175 P-51s escort; they claim 6-0-2 aircraft in the air and 84-0-43 on the ground; 2 P-51s are lost (pilots MIA).

4. 357 B-24s hit Rechlin Airfield (159), Larz Airfield at Rechlin (103) and Parchim Airfield (32); 9 others hit the marshalling yard at Wittenberge, a target of opportunity; 1 B-24 is lost; 4 airmen are WIA and 11 MIA. The escort is 207 of 220 P-51s; they claim 1-0-1 aircraft in the air and 20-0-21 on the ground.

5. 59 of 62 P-47s fly a freelance mission for the bombers; they claim 2-0-2 aircraft in the air and 41-0-66 on the ground.

6. 15 P-51s escort 20 of 21 F-5s on photo reconnaissance missions over Germany.

7. 30 P-51s fly a scouting mission; 1 is lost (pilot MIA).

Mission 939: 12 B-24s drop leaflets in the Netherlands, France and Germany during the night.

Mission 940: 13 of 14 B-24s bomb the Dessau rail depot by PFF methods during the night.

Source: THE ARMY AIR FORCES IN WORLD WAR II: COMBAT CHRONOLOGY, 1941-1945 by Carter / Mueller, the Office of Air Force History,

Mission Reports

303BG Mission Report - Target: Ordnance and Equipment Depot - Oranienburg, Germany. Crews Dispatched: 39 (358BS - 6, 359th - 11, 360th - 12, 427th - 10). Crews Lost: 2Lt. Murray - 8 KIA, 1 POW. Length of Mission: 8 hours, 19 minutes. Bomb Load: 8 x 500 lb S.A.P. & 4 x 500 lb M-17 Incendiary bombs. Bombing Altitudes: 25,000, 24,000& 26,000 feet.

Those who believed that the Luftwaffe was permanently grounded were in for a surprise. The 1st AD targeted the Oranienburg Ordnance and Equipment Depot as their No. 1 (visual) target. All other 1st AD, 2nd AD and 3rd AD targets were German airfields, and the German fighters came up to challenge the attack on their bases with a vengeance.

The 303BG dispatched 39 aircraft and one returned early with mechanical difficulties: #44-6517 (No Name) 360BS (Lt. Welshon). The remaining 38 B-17s bombed the No. 1 target with 296 500-lb. S.A.P., 151 500-lb. M-17 incendiary bombs and eight units of leaflets on target No. 1. Photos showed that the bombs of all three Squadrons hit in the target area, and the overall results were good. Over England there was 3/10th low clouds, tops at 8,000 feet, 5-7/10th middle clouds at 15-16,000 feet. These clouds disappeared over the Continent except for a few cirrus clouds near Hannover. The route back was much the same as the route in.

From six to eight ME-262s were encountered just after departing the target. Attacks were the usual tail attacks with some flying very close to the group formations, some to within 50 feet and some daring fighter pilots flew right through the formation. There were only two reports of nose and side attacks. Claims by 303BG(H) gunners were assessed at four probables, even though the gunners themselves believed that at least two were destroyed. The attacks lasted for twenty minutes. The 1st AD formations were protected by 273 P-51s with good support.

Moderate and accurate anti-aircraft fire was encountered by the lead and low Squadrons in the area around Merseburg and again at the target. Flak was inaccurate for the high Squadron. Four aircraft sustained major battle damage and nine, minor damage. Returning aircraft had no casualties. Mission One aircraft, #44-8427 Henn's Revenge, piloted by 2Lt. Robert I. Murray, with a crew of nine was lost. It was hit by the attacking ME-262s coming in on the tail of the missing aircraft. It burst into flames between the No. 3 and No. 4 engines, held course for very few seconds, then peeled slightly up and slid over and down to the right through the formation, apparently out of control, and crashed at Oranienburg. No parachutes were seen.

More info on this mission at the 303BG website

source: 303rd Bomb Group web page http://www.303rdbg.com/
306BG Mission Reportsource: 306th Bombardment Group website www.306bg.org/
34th BG Mission Report - Mission #162 Neuruppen, Stendal. Command Pilot: SMITH. 38 planes dispatched. 33 planes dropped 96 tons on the primary target while 4 planes dropped 12 tons on targets of opportunity (LR) and 1 plane failed to bomb. 38 Credit Sorties. One plane was lost and 2 crewmembers were listed as Wounded in Action. Hal Province #15.

B-17G 44-6820 E/CMissing in Action Brandenburg, flak. Crashed Brandenburg, Germany.Aircraft received a direct flak hit following bombs away. Aircraft started smoking and headed for the ground in a manner that developed into a spiral. It exploded on impact. Nine chutes were seen but it was also observed that ground defences were firing at the parachuting men. With 18BS. Pilot: Roscher. Missing Air Crew Report # 14198. 2 Evaded, 7 Prisoner of War.

source: 34th Bomb Group Mission List compiled by Gary L. Ferrell http://valortovictory.tripod.com
351BG Mission Report - 35 aircraft were sent on this mission. source: 351st Bomb Group web page http://www.351st.org/ken.harbour
388BG Mission Report - The 388th furnished three Groups for the 45th Combat Wing for this mission. 38 a/c were airborne between 1025 and 1047 hours and there were no abortions. The briefed route was followed to the target and was bombed visually at 1450 hours. Meager accurate flak was encountered on the bomb run.

All of our a/c returned to base by 1813 hours.

source: 388th Bomb Group web page http://www.388bg.info
398th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 398th Bomb Group web page http://www.398th.org/
401BG / 613BS Mission Report - April 10th saw another large scale attack deep into Germany around the Berlin area. The 401st was to bomb an ordnance depot at Oranienburg and sent out the usual 36 aircraft to do the job. It was another day when visual bombing was possible although the results were not as good as they should have been. The Lead Squadron bombed to the right and over although the circular error remained practically within the 2,000 foot. The Low Squadron had excellent results with 100% in the 1,000 foot radius --a "shack" --and the High Squadron aimed at the wrong point near the target, hitting another depot and thereby causing extensive damage. The only opposition met during the mission was in the form of meager flak in the Wittenburg area. At first it was inaccurate but then found the range of the Group and caused serne damage to two of the aircraft. One aircraft landed safely on the Continent and another went M.I.A. The M.I.A. crew was that of Lt. Spence of the 612th Squadron and they had quite a story to tell later on because they were forced to land on a Luftwaffe base that the Luftwaffe were still using! The following creww took part on this mission: 42-102947 Berneburg, 44-6842 Litchfield, 44-6132 Smith, 44-6125 King, 43-38862 Lovelace, 43-37706 Evans, 44-6313 Ford, 42-31591 Young, 44-3767 Shunk, 44-6588 Tripi, 43-38160 Snyder.source: 613th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 614BS Mission Report - This mission was in direct support of the Russian Armies and the target was an ordnance depot at Oranienburg just north of Berlin. The 38 aircraft of the 401st B.G. made up the 94th "B" Group and the Air Commander was Captain D.V. Kirkhuff. Takeoff was at 1050 hrs, and a few minutes before taxi time one of the contractors dumped two loads of asphalt on the perimeter track causing the first aircraft to go off the track and blocking runway No. 33. With about 400 bombers hitting Oranienburg at one time there was a considerable amount of smoke in the area and the results were not as good as they should have been. The Lead Squadron bombed to the right and over. The Low Squadron had excellent results with 100% of the bombs within the 1,000 foot radius -- a "shack" -- and the High Squadron aimed at the wrong point near the target, but hitting another depot and causing a lot of damage to it. The opposition on this mission was in the form of flak from the Wittenburg area, at first inaccurate but then becoming accurate and causing damage to some of the Group aircraft. One aircraft was forced to land on the continent and another, piloted by Lt. Spence, was forced to land on an active Luftwaffe base. The airfield was Fassberg and the B-17 was "HEAVY DATE", and it rested on this field for many years after WWII and was photographed by many of the RAF personnel serving there. Crews: 42-32012 Rochardson, 42-97322 Holmes, 42-97478 Stehman, 42-102077 Short, 42-97780 Gray, 43-38677 Cameron, 43-38738 Viehman, 42-97931 Ayre, 43-38330 Park, 42-107151 Friedsam, 42-102468 Gibson.source: 614th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 615BS Mission Report - On this mission the 401st were part of a force of 278 B-17's that dropped 797 tons of bombs on the German Army Headquarters at Oranienburg. The Group provided the aircraft to form the 94th liB" Group with Captain D.V. Kirkhuff as the Air Commander and Captain W.S. Harb and Lt. A.K. Wolf as the other two Squadron Commanders. Briefing for the 38 crews was at 0645 hrs with the last ship becoming airborne by 1046 hrs. Visual bombing was again carried out but the results were not as good as they should have been under the circumstances. The Lead Squadron bombed to the right and over although the circular error remained practically within the 2,000 feet. The Low Squadron had excellent results with 100% in the 1,000 foot radius. The High Squadron aimed at the wrong point near the target, hitting another depot and causing extensive damage. The only opposition on this mission was some meagre flak from the Wittenburg area. At first it was inaccurate but then found the correct height and elevation and caused major damage to two aircraft. One of these, No. 43-38788, Squadron Code SC-T, piloted by Lt. C.P. Spence, made a wheels-up landing on the active Luftwaffe base of Fassberg. Two of the crew were injured, five escaped from their German guards a~d three were made POW. The six crews from the 615th on this mission were: 43-39941 Hartsock, 44-8812 Wolf, 44-8449 Knowles, 44-6947 Tobin, 44-8708 Cole, 44-8648 Seder.source: 615th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
44BG Mission Report - The 44th dispatched 33 aircraft to lead the 14th Wing to the priority #1 target, Parchim Airfield, located 25 miles S.E. of Schwerin, Germany. Lt. Reynolds led the high right squadron composed of nine aircraft of the 67th Squadron. Bombing was accomplished visually, by squadron, for the lead and high right squadrons. The low left squadron dropped on their leader and approximately seven miles short due to a premature and accidental release. The lead bombardier of this squadron had cocked the trigger on his sight while making a preliminary rate run. When the indices crossed, bombs went "away". Enemy opposition was nil and our fighters furnished very good support. All aircraft returned to base safely, none of them having sustained any battle damage. Four crews on local flights including practice bombing and high altitude test hop. Site 3 inspected - conditions good.source: 44th Bomb Group web page http://www.8thairforce.com/44thbg
445BG Mission Report - Target: Rechlin, Germany - German Airdrome. A/C Took Off: 32. A/C Bombed Target: 20. A/C Lost: 0source: 445th Bomb Group http://445bg.org
446th Bomb Group Mission Report
Rechlin airfield

32 planes attacked and good results were reported.

source: 446th Bomb Group www.446bg.com
457th Bomb Group Mission Linksource: 457 Bomb Group http://www.457thbombgroup.org
467th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 467th Bomb Group web page http://www.467bg.com/
486th Bomb Group Flimsy reportsource: 486th Bomb Group web page http://www.486th.org/
91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report - Target: Oranienburg Ordnance and equipment depot of the SS forces. The primary target was the ordnance and equipment depot at Oranienburg. This squadron furnished the high squadron for this mission. The lead and high squadron bombed Oranienburg with good results. The low squadron bombed Rechlin/Larz A/D with unobserved results.source: 91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/

Non-Combat Accident Reports

Aircraft: B-17G (#42-97169).
Organization: 509BS / 351BG of Polebrook, Northamptonshire.
Pilot: Sanford, Robert O.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Polebrook, Northamptonshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-38070).
Organization: 509BS / 351BG of Polebrook, Northamptonshire.
Pilot: [parked aircraft].
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Polebrook, Northamptonshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 1
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-38109).
Organization: 364BS / 305BG of Chelveston, Northamptonshire.
Pilot: Stahl, Frederick N.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Chelveston, Northamptonshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: C-64A (#43-35386).
Organization: / 44ADG of Merville, France.
Pilot: Gatti, Larry (NMI).
Notes: take off accident.
Location: Merville, France France.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: L-4B (#43-631).
Organization: / 4CBW of Bury St. Edmonds, Suffolk.
Pilot: Delle, Monache, Louis J.
Notes: unknown.
Location: Bury St. Edmonds, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 1
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: L-4J (#44-80632).
Organization: / of Warton, Lancashire.
Pilot: Bredda, Larry J.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: St Dizier/A-64 France.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: Mosquito III (#LR530).
Organization: 653BS / 25BG of Watton, Norfolk.
Pilot: Horvath, Andrew C.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Watton, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51B (#43-7040W).
Organization: 434FS / 479FG of Wattisham, Suffolk.
Pilot: Pease, Roscoe I Jr.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Wattisham, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51B7 (#43-6593W).
Organization: 84FS / 78FG of Duxford, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: Ryan, Maurice J Jr.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Duxford, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D10 (#44-14151).
Organization: 487FS / 352FG of Chievres, Belgium.
Pilot: Prichard, Joseph W.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Chievres, Belgium Belgium.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51K5 (#44-11664).
Organization: 369FS / 359FG of East Wretham, Norfolk.
Pilot: Klaver, Ralph R.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: East Wretham, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/

Mission Stats (Targets, Aircraft, Casualties, etc.)

Mission "8th AF 938"
Jet airfields and army base near Berlin
April 10, 1945

Primary source for mission statistics: Mighty Eighth War Diary by Roger A. Freeman
 
Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
131512323402.417-4-120-0-019-4-2542-11-1752x 305BG aircraft collide
100BG aircraft crash-lands Westleton
401BG aircraft crash-lands Fassberg
306BG aircraft crashes near Hannover
100BG aircraft crashes continent
 asdfasdfasdf
Mission Targets

Click blue links for maps, photos and other documents.

This will open a new tab in your browser

ORANIENBURG, GERMANY
military
Army HQ278 A/C
ORANIENBURG, GERMANY
Airfield
139 A/C
RECHLIN, GERMANY
Larz Flugplatz Airfield
11 A/Cphotos (1)
NEURUPPIN, GERMANY
Airfield
132 A/C
STENDAL, GERMANY
Railroad
marshalling yard9 A/Cphotos (1)
BRANDENBURG, GERMANY
Briest Airfield
138 A/Cphotos (1)
ZERBST, GERMANY
Airfield
75 A/C
BURG BEI MAGDEBURG, GERMANY
Airfield
147 A/C
RECHLIN, GERMANY
Larz Flugplatz Airfield
159 A/Cphotos (1)
LARZ, GERMANY
Airfield
103 A/C
PARCHIM, GERMANY
Airfield
32 A/C
WITTENBERGE, GERMANY
Railroad
marshalling yard9 A/C
Aircraft Groups

Click blue links for info on the group.

This will open a new tab in your browser.

1ST AIR DIVISION
303BG
305BG
306BG
351BG
379BG
381BG
384BG
398BG
401BG
457BG
91BG
92BG
2ND AIR DIVISION
44BG
93BG
389BG
445BG
446BG
448BG
453BG
458BG
466BG
467BG
491BG
3RD AIR DIVISION
94BG
100BG
34BG
385BG
388BG
390BG
447BG
452BG
486BG
487BG
490BG
493BG
95BG
96BG
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
Aircraft Losses

Click blue links for info on the MIA aircraft (if known).
This will open a new tab in your browser.

1ST AIR DIVISION
303BG (1 a/c)
305BG (2 a/c)
379BG (2 a/c)
398BG (1 a/c)
401BG (1 a/c)
457BG (2 a/c)
2ND AIR DIVISION
453BG (1 a/c)
3RD AIR DIVISION
100BG (1 a/c)
34BG (1 a/c)
486BG (2 a/c)
487BG (4 a/c)
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)

Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
9058680.02-0-2309-0-2358-0-00-2-878FG crash-lands
56FG crashes Belgium
56FG crash-lands Belgium
 asdfasdfasdf
Mission Targets

Click blue links for maps, photos and other documents.

This will open a new tab in your browser


Escort
779 A/C

Support
59 A/C

Reconnaissance
scout30 A/C
Aircraft Groups

Click blue links for info on the group.

This will open a new tab in your browser.

1ST AIR DIVISION
20FG
352FG
356FG
359FG
364FG
2ND AIR DIVISION
4FG
56FG
355FG
361FG
479FG
3RD AIR DIVISION
55FG
78FG
339FG
353FG
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
Aircraft Losses

Click blue links for info on the MIA aircraft (if known).
This will open a new tab in your browser.

1ST AIR DIVISION
20FG (3 a/c)
1SF (1 a/c)
364FG (1 a/c)
2ND AIR DIVISION
3RD AIR DIVISION
55FG (1 a/c)
78FG (2 a/c)
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
1FG (1 a/c)

Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
61590.00-0-00-0-00-0-00-0-0
 asdfasdfasdf
Mission Targets

Click blue links for maps, photos and other documents.

This will open a new tab in your browser

GERMANY
Reconnaissance
photo21 A/C

Chaff
4 A/C
CONTINENT / NORTH SEA
Reconnaissance
weather5 A/C
AZORES/ATLANTIC/UK
Reconnaissance
weather4 A/C

Air Sea Rescue
22 A/C

Communications
radio countermeasures5 A/C
Aircraft Groups

Click blue links for info on the group.

This will open a new tab in your browser.

1ST AIR DIVISION
25BG
2ND AIR DIVISION
3RD AIR DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
7th Photographic Group (Recon)
5th Emergency Rescue Squadron
36th Bomber Squadron
Aircraft Losses

Click blue links for info on the MIA aircraft (if known).
This will open a new tab in your browser.

1ST AIR DIVISION
2ND AIR DIVISION
3RD AIR DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)