Mission

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Narrative - Official Air Force Mission Description

Mission 720: 1,291 bombers and 954 fighters are dispatched to make PFF attacks using H2X on oil targets in Germany; they claim 73-7-25 Luftwaffe aircraft; 25 bombers and 15 fighters are lost:

1. 421 B-17s are sent to hit the Leuna synthetic oil plant at Merseburg (200); targets of opportunity are Meppen (24), Friedburg (21), Hersfeld (12) and Hunfeld (12) marshaling yards, flak gun batteries at Merseburg (12), Leeuwarden Airfield (11), Apolda (10) the Autobahn at Hersfeld (10), Quakenbruck (10), and other (69); the AAF claims 1-0-1 aircraft; 14 B-17s are lost, 3 damaged beyond repair and 205 damaged; 1 airman is KIA, 16 WIA and 129 MIA. Escort is 268 of 310 P-51s; they claim 63-7-20 aircraft in the air and 3-0-2 on the ground; 9 P-51s are lost (pilots MIA).

2. 402 B-17s are sent to Sterkrade, Lendorf and Hamburg but hit the secondary, the Osnarbruck marshaling yard (166) and last resort targets, i.e., Giessen marshaling yard (77), Wetzlar (62), Lingen (24), Koblenz marshaling yard (23), Bielefeld marshaling yard (9), and targets of opportunity (35); 7 B-17s are lost, 3 damaged beyond repair and 142 damaged; 2 airmen are KIA, 6 WIA and 65 MIA. Escort is 382 of 420 P-51s; 4 P-51s are lost (pilots MIA).

3. 366 B-24s are sent to hit the Dpag (178) and Rhenania (171) oil plants at Hamburg; 4 B-24s are lost, 2 damaged beyond repair and 220 damaged; 19 airmen are KIA, 8 WIA and 89 MIA. Escort is 177 P-47s and P-51s; they claim 5-0-2 aircraft in the air and 2-0-1 on the ground; 1 P-47 and 1 P-51 are lost (pilots MIA).

4. 12 of 12 B-17s fly a screening mission.

5. 31 of 33 P-51s fly a scouting mission.

Mission 721: 7 B-17s and 5 B-24s drop leaflets in France, the Netherlands and Germany during the night.

Source: THE ARMY AIR FORCES IN WORLD WAR II: COMBAT CHRONOLOGY, 1941-1945 by Carter / Mueller, the Office of Air Force History,

Mission Reports

303BG Mission Report - Target: Leuna Synthetic Oil Refinery at Merseburg, Germany. Crews Dispatched: 39 (358BS - 13, 359th - 13, 360th - 0, 427th - 13). Crews Lost: Lt. Virag - 9 POW; Lt. Cureton - 8 KIA, 1 POW; Lt. Chance - 3 KIA, 6 POW; Lt. Glass - 9 POW. Length of Mission: 8 hours, 15 minutes. Bomb Load: 10 x 500 lb bombs. Bombing Altitudes: 19,800, 19,700 & 18,100 ft. Ammo Fired: 14,700 round.

Two 303rd BG(H) aircraft returned early: #44-6502 (No Name), 359BS (Lt. Underdown) had mechanical problems and #42-102945 Sweet Pea, 358BS (Lt. Mayer) lost the No. 2 engine.

Each Squadron made their own bomb run due to weather conditions. 1Lt. J.D. Mickle, deputy leader, and his crew, took over the 359th Lead Squadron just before the initial point when Capt. Heller's electronic equipment failed. Twelve B-17s targeted Merseburg from 19,800 feet via PFF. Bombs hit about 15 miles NNE of assigned MPI. Capt. Heller resumed the lead near the Dutch coast. The 358th High Squadron B-17s hit near Wiezenfels from 19,700 feet. One B-17 was hit by flak and jettisoned its bombs. Five others dropped on it. The lead B-17 was hit on the bomb run and jettisoned its bombs. Five others then dropped their bombs. Results weren't observed. Twelve 427th Low Squadron B-17s bombed Merseburg from 18,100 feet. Results weren't observed. Photos showed no target bursts.

In the target area, there was a thick belt of haze from 18,000 to 28,000 feet, with dense and very persistent contrails and no middle or high clouds. These conditions precluded visual bombing and contributed directly to the high squadron being unable to bomb the primary target. They were unable to achieve the proper interval behind the lead Squadron and the PFF navigator could not locate the target.

A few enemy aircraft were reported, but none attacked 303rd BG(H) aircraft. The Merseburg defenders put up a fierce barrage of intense and accurate flak, and chaff had no effect in deterring the determined German gunners. Thirty-one aircraft were damaged: 26 major and 5 minor. Returned aircraft had six wounded crewmen.

#44-6600 (No Name), 359BS, piloted by 1Lt. Andy R. Virag, took over the second (high) flight of the lead Squadron after the mission had been aborted by Lt. Sidney L. Underdown. During the bomb run the right wing was hit and the right aileron was knocked off by B-17 #44-6309, The Duchess Granddaughter, 359BS, piloted by Lt. James F. Green. The B-17 was last observed under control, going down about 5,000 to 6,000 feet below the formation. No parachutes were seen. Minutes later, after losing altitude and having difficulty maintaining control, it was hit by ME-109s. The pilot ordered the crew to bail out. The aircraft crashed near Sangerhausen, Germany.

B-17 #43-38705 (No Name). 360BS piloted by 1Lt. Peter F. Cureton, Jr. with his 427BS crew, was hit by flak just before "bombs away." The No. 3 engine was on fire with flames streaming back to the tail. The No. 2 engine reportedly caught fire as the aircraft went down. Bombs were salvoed at about 18,000 feet and thrown out and up as the aircraft, still burning and seemingly under control, turned "turtle" to the right. The aircraft crashed near Leipzig, Germany.

#42-102484 Heller's Angel, 359BS, piloted by 1Lt. Arthur F. Chance, was hit by flak, causing the No. 4 engine to catch on fire. With the fire out, the aircraft was last seen flying on three engines, seemingly under control. The formation was flying in a thick belt of haze and contrails, making visibility extremely limited. There were no parachutes observed. The aircraft crashed near Frankfurt.

#44-6503 Lady Alta, 358BS, piloted by 1Lt. Leroy E. Glass, was hit by flak on the bomb run. Returning crews reported that it pulled out of formation, was flying about 500 to 1,000 feet below the formation, and held that position for about 30 seconds. It peeled off and was last seen diving down with all four engines running. The bombs were salvoed and the B-17 seemed to be under control. No parachutes were observed.

More info on this mission at the 303BG website

source: 303rd Bomb Group web page http://www.303rdbg.com/
306BG Mission Reportsource: 306th Bombardment Group website www.306bg.org/
34th BG Mission Report - Mission #91 Osnabruck. Command Pilot: CRABTREE. 36 planes dispatched. 31 planes dropped 92 tons on LR target. 5 planes failed to bomb. 36 Credit Sorties. 1 airman wounded in action. Pathfinder bombing. Results unobserved. source: 34th Bomb Group Mission List compiled by Gary L. Ferrell http://valortovictory.tripod.com
351BG Mission Report - 35 aircraft were sent on this mission.

43-37727 Lt. W. E. Loehndorf - Shot down by flak. POW 6, KIA 3.

source: 351st Bomb Group web page http://www.351st.org/ken.harbour
392nd Bomb Group Mission Reportsource: 392nd Bomb Group web page http://www.b24.net/missions/
398th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 398th Bomb Group web page http://www.398th.org/
401BG / 613BS Mission Report - In the face of determined opposition the Leuna oil works at Merseburg was bombed by PFF on November 21st by the 94th "B" Group in which eight crews from the 613th Squadron flew. The flak at the target was intense and accurate resulting in the loss of three aircraft including Lt. R.J. Keck and his crew. When last observed their No.2 engine was on fire with flames trailing behind the tail. It flew for about four or five minutes after being hit and then it started to straggle and at this point it was attacked by an Me-109 causing the aircraft to explode at about 10,000 ft after rolling over in a steep dive. Four of the crew bailed out according to reports, one chute opening, the other three men disappearing into clouds. Crews of the 613th participating were: 43-38160 Tausig, 42-102947 Hopley, 43-37706 Annis, 44-6104 Keck, 43-38187 Carson, Coleman, 44-6313 Baker, 42-38267 Cox, 42-31072 Curran.source: 613th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 614BS Mission Report - Capt. A.R. Chapman led the 94th "B" Group to strike at oil targets again. This target had been hit repeatedly and was always a big fighter hazard. Bombs were released on PFF and the results were not observed. The flak was accurate and intense. Lt. F.Z. Rundell, in the deputy lead position, was lost over the target. The last report on his aircraft, 42-97600, was that it had received a direct hit by flak on the No.2 engine over the target; the prop was feathered and the engine nacelle was on fire, it side-slipped out of formation to put out the fire but did not succeed in doing so. The aircraft then broke up and only one or two chutes were seen to come out. 44-8033 Mercer, 43-38600 Rundell, 43-38646 White, 42-107151 Mays, 42-38330 Richardson, 44-6464 Wittman, 44-6508 Sisson, 42-102659 Thompson, 43-38677 Babcock, 42-97322 St. Aubyn.source: 614th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 615BS Mission Report - Briefing for 39 crews was at 0415 hrs with all aircraft except three away by 0820 hrs. The three spares were used in place of them. The briefed primary and secondary target were again the same Merseburg synthetic oil refinery plants the Group had been to 50 many times before. As usual a deck of clouds encountered at the I.P. and extending upwards from 18,000 feet to 30,000 feet caused the formation to become separated, necessitating a PFF run. No observations were possible. The 401st furnished the 94th "B" Group, led by Captain A.H. Chapman, flyxng with Lt. E.W. Mercer. Captain Harb and Captain Goodman were the other two Squadron leaders. Although enemy aircraft were reported in the target vicinity, only one Me-109 appeared. It made an attack on a straggling flak-ridden B-17 of the 401st and succeeded in shooting it down. Subsequently the Me-109 was shot down by one of the 401st aircraft, resulting in a claim. The B-17 shot down was IN-N, Serial No. 44-6104, piloted by 1st Lt. R.J. Keck. Flak was described as intense and accurate at the target and along the route at Weimar. IN-Y, serial No. 42-97600, piloted by Captain F.E. Rundell went down after being hit by flak. A 615th aircraft, 42-107113, with 1st Lt. P.J. Sullivan at the controls, force-landed in Belgium. Besides the two aircraft lost 2 aircraft received major battle damage and 21 minor flak damage. Also, four men were wounded, one seriously. Nine 615th crews flew this mission, they were: 42-107113 Sullivan, 42-102468 Djernes, 43-38779 Grimm, 42-31983 Calloway, 43-37551 Maloney, 42-31730 Sombart, 43-38425 Udy, 43-38458 Hansen, 42-97664 Maire.source: 615th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 612BS Mission Report - With the very bad weather conditions holding the crews on the ground the Group did not participate on another mission until November 21st when the German oil industries again became the object of the Air Force and the 401st sent 36 aircraft in Group formation to attack the Luena works at Merseburg, Germany. They flew as the 94th CBW "B" Group on this effort. A terrific front of clouds was confronting the formation just after leaving the I.P. area and forced them to bomb at 19,000 to 20,000 feet, this being 6,000 to 7,000 feet below briefed altitude. Also the PFF method of bombing was necessary and no results could be obtained due to clouds obscuring the strikes. Several aircraft in the High Squadron did not bomb the assigned target because clouds split up their formation.

Intense and accurate Flak was encountered at the target and fairly accurate Flak of the moderate variety was met from Weimar. This caused battle damage to 19 of the aircraft and wounds to five of the personnel, one serious. Also it was the cause of two losses with one aircraft going down from Flak and one that was straggling because of Flak damage was shot down by a lone 109 enemy fighter. This was the only enemy fighter encountered and it was destroyed by another aircraft in our formation. Captain Goodman was leading the High Squadron on this mission flying with Lt. Christensen. Besides this crew nine other 612th crews completed the mission with Lt. Cromer flying Deputy High Squadron lead. Lt. Bloetscher, filled in as spare when an aircraft aborted from another Squadron. Crews: 42-106992 Roadman, 44-6506 Schliemann, 42-102393 Jones, 43-38637 Long, 42-102398 Maxwell, 43-37628 Aiken, 42-97780 Christensen, 43-38788 Bloetscher, 43-38733 Cromer, 42-107039 Ritting.

source: 612th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 612BS Mission Report - With the very bad weather conditions holding the crews on the ground the Group did not participate on another mission until November 21st when the German oil industries again became the object of the Air Force and the 401st sent 36 aircraft in Group formation to attack the Luena works at Merseburg, Germany. They flew as the 94th CBW "B" Group on this effort. A terrific front of clouds was confronting the formation just after leaving the I.P. area and forced them to bomb at 19,000 to 20,000 feet, this being 6,000 to 7,000 feet below briefed altitude. Also the PFF method of bombing was necessary and no results could be obtained due to clouds obscuring the strikes. Several aircraft in the High Squadron did not bomb the assigned target because clouds split up their formation.

Intense and accurate Flak was encountered at the target and fairly accurate Flak of the moderate variety was met from Weimar. This caused battle damage to 19 of the aircraft and wounds to five of the personnel, one serious. Also it was the cause of two losses with one aircraft going down from Flak and one that was straggling because of Flak damage was shot down by a lone 109 enemy fighter. This was the only enemy fighter encountered and it was destroyed by another aircraft in our formation. Captain Goodman was leading the High Squadron on this mission flying with Lt. Christensen. Besides this crew nine other 612th crews completed the mission with Lt. Cromer flying Deputy High Squadron lead. Lt. Bloetscher, filled in as spare when an aircraft aborted from another Squadron. Crews: 42-106992 Roadman, 44-6506 Schliemann, 42-102393 Jones, 43-38637 Long, 42-102398 Maxwell, 43-37628 Aiken, 42-97780 Christensen, 43-38788 Bloetscher, 43-38733 Cromer, 42-107039 Ritting.

source: 612th Bombardment Squadron History
44BG Mission Report - The target for today was the Crude Oil Refinery at Harburg, Germany. Lt. Harris led the low left section in the Group formation of 30 planes, leading the 14th Combat Wing. One section was made up by the eight ships the 67th sent. All aircraft reached the objective and bombed on PFF equipment. Intense accurate, barrage type and tracking flak was encountered in the target area. All aircraft suffered battle damage. 1st Lt. Robert A. Burke, Navigator on Lt. Phillip's crew, was killed in action when he was hit by a heavy unexploded projectile that simply blew him to pieces and scattered it over the ship. It was the most gruesome episode of the war, so far as the 67th's returning planes revealed. A portion of Lt. Burks body was blown out of the side navigator's window and bent the #2 propeller. S/Sgt Philip Kostakos, LW gunner on this same plane, was wounded by flak as well. S/Sgt. W. Dorrisey, LW gunner on Lt. Harris' crew, was slightly wounded by flak. T/Sgt. F.J. Peck, radio operator on Lt. Condray's crew, suffered a slight flak - wound on his face. S/Sgt. Albert H. Abercrombie, RW gunner on Lt. Spencer's crew, suffered an ankle wound from flak. All A/C returned to base, luckily. It was several weeks before Lt. Phillip's plane would be returned to operational status due to the impossibility of getting it clean as well as to make repairs. Men just did not want to fly in it. The A/C M? #44-10552 J ??source: 44th Bomb Group web page http://www.8thairforce.com/44thbg
445BG Mission Report - Target: Hamburg, Germany - Rhenania Oil Refinery. A/C Took Off: 33. A/C Bombed Target: 33. A/C Lost: 1source: 445th Bomb Group http://445bg.org
446th Bomb Group Mission Report
Hamburg

The groups first mission after a 10 day standown for runway repair was not a good one. An oil refinery was hit and intense flak brought down Satans Little Sister (42-95180). 7 Crewmen were killed and 2 more evaded capture.

source: 446th Bomb Group www.446bg.com
457th Bomb Group Mission Linksource: 457 Bomb Group http://www.457thbombgroup.org
467th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 467th Bomb Group web page http://www.467bg.com/
486th Bomb Group Flimsy reportsource: 486th Bomb Group web page http://www.486th.org/
91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report - Merseburg Synthetic oil. Squadron losses: 1 A/C and crew ( Personnel - 9 ) Our squadron furnished the lead squadron for this group. Major Klette was leading and consequently led the Eighth Air Force on the mission. The formation was forced below briefed bombing altitude by cloud cover and thus bombed from 20,000 ft., instead of the briefed 24,500 ft.. Results were reported as good by mickey operator whose equipment was working well.source: 91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/

Non-Combat Accident Reports

Aircraft: B-17G (#42-102566).
Organization: 545BS / 384BG of .
Pilot: Renshaw, Charles E.
Notes: ground accident due to mechanical failure.
Location: Grafton Underwood England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-31143).
Organization: 368BS / 306BG of Thurleigh, Bedfordshire.
Pilot: [parked aircraft].
Notes: ground accident.
Location: Thurleigh, Bedfordshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 2
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-38047).
Organization: 351BS / 100BG of Thorpe Abbots, Norfolk.
Pilot: Dovel, Ronald L.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Thorpe Abbots, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-37764).
Organization: 337BS / 96BG of Snetterton Heath, Norfolk.
Pilot: Boyd, John K.
Notes: crash landing.
Location: Snetterton Heath/ 1/2miS England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-38270).
Organization: 550BS / 385BG of .
Pilot: Webb, James S.
Notes: killed in mid air collision.
Location: {51.54N-08.45E} Germany.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage):
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-38370).
Organization: 860BS / 493BG of Debach, Suffolk.
Pilot: Schnieder, Edward C.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Debach, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-38371).
Organization: 860BS / 493BG of Debach, Suffolk.
Pilot: Carney, Kenneth J.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Debach, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-38566).
Organization: 550BS / 385BG of .
Pilot: Foss, Clifford W.
Notes: mid air collision.
Location: {51.54N-08.45E} Germany.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage):
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-38704).
Organization: 527BS / 379BG of .
Pilot: Thomas, Harry S.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Kimbolton, Huntingdonshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage):
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24D (#41-23682W).
Organization: 859BS / 492BG of Harrington, Northamptonshire.
Pilot: Seccafico, James A.
Notes: take off accident.
Location: Harrington, Northamptonshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24H (#42-52154).
Organization: 734BS / 453BG of Old Buckenham, Norfolk.
Pilot: McArdle, John C.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Old Buckenham, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24J (#42-50452).
Organization: 566BS / 389BG of Hethel, Norfolk.
Pilot: Brooks, Alfred J.
Notes: killed in mid air collision.
Location: Old Buckenham/1mi E England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24J (#44-10513).
Organization: 565BS / 389BG of Hethel, Norfolk.
Pilot: Rhine, James E.
Notes: killed in mid air collision.
Location: Old Buckenham/1mi E England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24J (#44-40232).
Organization: 855BS / 491BG of North Pickenham, Norfolk.
Pilot: Goodrich, Frank C.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: North Pickenham, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51C1 (#42-103283).
Organization: 486FS / 352FG of Bodney, Norfolk.
Pilot: Contos, George G.
Notes: ground looped.
Location: Bodney, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51C7 (#42-103363).
Organization: 504FS / 339FG of Fowlmere, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: Barrett, Lawrence J.
Notes: take off accident.
Location: Fowlmere, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D10 (#44-14348).
Organization: 343FS / 55FG of Wormingford, Essex.
Pilot: Ryan, Eugene E.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Wormingford, Essex England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/

Mission Stats (Targets, Aircraft, Casualties, etc.)

Mission "8th AF 721"
Night Leaflet Operation Nov 21/22 1944
November 21, 1944

Primary source for mission statistics: Mighty Eighth War Diary by Roger A. Freeman
 
Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
12120.00-0-00-0-00-0-00-0-0
 asdfasdfasdf
Mission Targets

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THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
DELFT, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
BUSSUM, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
STRAELEN, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
KALDENKIRCHEN, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
BRUGGEN, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
SLIEDRECHT, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
GORINCHEM, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
HEINSBERG, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
HUCKELHOVEN, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
BAAL, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
LINNICH, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
MERZHAUSEN, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
COLOGNE, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
SELGERSDORF, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
JULICH, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
INDEN, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
DUREN, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
SOLLER, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
WOLLERSHEIM, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
HAAMSTEDE, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
BROUWERSHAVEN, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
ZIERIKZEE, NETHERLANDS
Leaflet drop
TRIER, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
MERZIG, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
SAARLAUTERN, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
CARLING, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
FORBACH, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
BITCHE, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
SARRE-UNION, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
BERTHELMING, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
MULHOUSE, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
ENSISHEIM, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
NEUF-BRISACH, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
MARCKOLSHEIM, FRANCE
Leaflet drop
WASSENBERG, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
ERKELENZ, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
ELSDORF, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
BLATZHEIM, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
MECHERNICH, GERMANY
Leaflet drop
Aircraft Groups

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
422BS
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
Aircraft Losses

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)

Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
12110.00-0-00-0-00-0-00-0-0482BG aircraft forced to land Belgium
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Mission Targets

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Reconnaissance
radar scope3 A/C
VENLO, NETHERLANDS
bridge Reconnaissance
photo3 A/C

Communications
radio countermeasures6 A/C
Aircraft Groups

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
25BG
482BG
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
36th Bomber Squadron
Aircraft Losses

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)