Mission

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MISSION DETAILS

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Narrative - Official Air Force Mission Description

Mission 639: 248 of 252 B-24s drop supplies to the First Allied Airborne Army in the Netherlands; intense flak downs 7 B-24s, 6 are damaged beyond repair and 154 damaged; 1 airman is KIA, 26 WIA and 61 MIA. 500+ P-38s, P-47s and P-51s escort the B-24s, escort C-47s of the First Allied Airborne Army as the second troop echelon is dropped in the Netherlands to participate in heavy fighting around the Arnhem area; 2 fighter groups strafe rail and highway traffic and 50+ fighters bomb flak positions; 100+ Luftwaffe fighters attack; AAF claims 29-0-1 aircraft in the air; 20 fighters are lost, 9 damaged beyond repair and 46 damaged; 1 pilot is KIA and 20 MIA.

Mission 640: In the last Operations FRANTIC mission, 107 of 110 B-17s drop 1,248 containers of supplies to Polish forces in Warsaw; 1 B-17 is lost and 7 damaged. Escort is provided by 137 of 150 P-51s (64 P-51s continue to the USSR), they claim 4-0-0 aircraft in the air and 3-0-6 on the ground; 2 P-51s are lost (pilots are MIA).

Mission 641: 8 of 8 B-17s drop leaflets in France, the Netherlands and Germany during the night.

Source: THE ARMY AIR FORCES IN WORLD WAR II: COMBAT CHRONOLOGY, 1941-1945 by Carter / Mueller, the Office of Air Force History,

Mission Reports

392nd Bomb Group Mission Reportsource: 392nd Bomb Group web page http://www.b24.net/missions/
44BG Mission Report - There has been quite a bit of confusion in the minds of the personnel on this station during the past few days. The reason lots of low-level formation practicing! Today the answer was evident. The Group dispatched 40 aircraft (10 by each Squadron) to drop food supplies and ammunition to airborne forces operating behind the enemy lines at Best, Holland,- who had dropped there yesterday. The entire mission was carried out at low level. We left the English coast at 1100 feet, entered the Dutch coast at that same altitude, came down over the target at 400 feet, dropped the huge packages, climbed to 3,000 feet, and then let down again over the Channel to enter the English coast at 1000 feet. The results were excellent as reported by the drop masters, with all parachutes landing in the drop zone. Enemy resistance encountered was from small arms fire, and 27 of the Group's airplanes were slightly damaged and two men were wounded. All planes returned safely to base except one squadron's ship that was forced to land in Belgium near Brussels. Three ships were involved in crash-landings due to flat tires, etc. Lt. Henry's ship K+ 279 flew deputy lead. Lt. Jones adds this: "Supplies consisted of medical stuff, K-rations, guns and ammunition. We don't take off until 1300 hours, the whole Wing is flying supplies today. All along our course the Dutch people gather in groups to wave at us. We're so low one can almost shake hands with them. We Pull up to 300 feet to release our cargo. My racks fail to function properly and we leave the squadron to make our own run and then release on salvo. This time we get the stuff out! We started out the same we came in, except almost alone. The Group catches quite a bit of small-arms fire from the Germans. It is mostly .30 cal. stuff. We are the first ones back and land just as we find out we're leaking gas. A .30 cal. is in the wing tank and the ship will not be able to fly for a couple of days. Three ships pile up on landing - no nose wheel, flat tires and shot-up hydraulic systems. All the cattle in Holland got a good workout today. 1st Lt. Weatherwax, asst. S-2 officer, relieved from assigned and assigned to CPO 70th RD.source: 44th Bomb Group web page http://www.8thairforce.com/44thbg
446th Bomb Group Mission Report
Supply drop, Nijmegen, Holland

Gasoline, food, and ammunition were dropped to the ground troops, which had just parachuted into the area. The group commander, Colonel Jacob Brogger, was injured by an explosive bullet and was sent home.

source: 446th Bomb Group www.446bg.com

Non-Combat Accident Reports

Aircraft: B-17G (#42-102496).
Organization: 359BS / 303BG of Molesworth, Huntingdonshire.
Pilot: Gould, Graham, C.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Molesworth, Huntingdonshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-97796).
Organization: 368BS / 306BG of Thurleigh, Bedfordshire.
Pilot: Edwards, Robert L.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Thurleigh, Bedfordshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-97853).
Organization: 360BS / 303BG of Molesworth, Huntingdonshire.
Pilot: Howard, Victor L.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Molesworth, Huntingdonshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24H (#42-95139).
Organization: 852BS / 491BG of North Pickenham, Norfolk.
Pilot: Stahl, Horst H.
Notes: crash landing.
Location: Watton, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: Mosquito XVI (#MM384).
Organization: 654BSR / 25BGR of Watton, Norfolk.
Pilot: Vinyard, Claybourne O.
Notes: ground looped.
Location: Watton, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#44-19873).
Organization: 359FS / 356FG of Martlesham Heath, Suffolk.
Pilot: Bruner, Frederick W.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Martlesham Heath, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D10 (#44-14125).
Organization: 335FS / 4FG of Debden, Essex.
Pilot: Lewis, Ralph E.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Debden, Essex England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/

Mission Stats (Targets, Aircraft, Casualties, etc.)

Mission "Other Operations"
Radio counter measure op
September 18, 1944

Primary source for mission statistics: Mighty Eighth War Diary by Roger A. Freeman
 
Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
770.00-0-00-0-00-0-00-0-0
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Mission Targets

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Communications
radio countermeasures7 A/C
Aircraft Groups

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
36th Bomber Squadron
Aircraft Losses

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)