Mission

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Narrative - Official Air Force Mission Description

Mission 613: 68 of 72 B-17s fly Operation GRASSY to drop 180 containers of supplies to French Resistance Fighters 25 miles (40 km) S of Besancon without loss. Escort is provided by 30 of 32 P-51s without loss.

Mission 614: 1,140 bombers and 435 fighters are dispatched to hit targets in W Germany; the primaries are attacked by both visual and PFF means; 14 bombers and 1 fighter are lost:

1. 419 B-17s are dispatched to hit the marshaling yard at Mannheim (387); 2 others hit targets of opportunity; 5 B-17s are lost and 197 damaged; 10 airmen are WIA and 54 MIA. Escort is provided by 140 of 152 P-51s without loss.

2. 337 B-24s are dispatched to hit the marshaling yard at Mainz (265); targets of opportunity are the marshaling yard at Worms (24) and Koblenz (6); 3 B-24s are lost, 3 damaged beyond repair and 104 damaged; 5 airmen are KIA and 33 MIA. Escort is provided by 125 of 128 P-51s without loss.

3. 384 B-17s are dispatched to an armaments plant at Dusseldorf (251); targets of opportunity are Bonn (12), Leverkusen (11) and others (16); 6 B-17s are lost, 2 damaged beyond repair and 148 damaged; 2 airmen are KIA, 3 WIA and 63 MIA. Escort is provided by 142 of 155 P-51s; 1 P-51 is lost.

Mission 618: 7 of 7 B-17s drop leaflets on Belgium, France and Germany during the night.

VIII Fighter Command fighter-bomber missions:

1. 44 P-47s sweep the Lingen-Munster-Haltern area to spot flak positions and troop concentrations and strafe an airfield; they claim 1-1-0 aircraft in the air and on the ground.

2. 196 P-47s and P-51s bomb and strafe shipping between the German mainland and Schouwen, Overflakee and Walcheren Islands, the Netherlands, installations on the islands, and rail and road traffic NW and NE of Frankfurt/Main; they claim 13-0-5 aircraft in the air and on the ground; 7 P-47s and 1 P-51 are lost; 1 P-47 and 1 P-51 are damaged beyond repair and 14 P-47s and 3 P-51s are damaged; 1 pilot is WIA and 7 MIA.

40 B-24s and C-47s fly CARPETBAGGER mission during the night.

Source: THE ARMY AIR FORCES IN WORLD WAR II: COMBAT CHRONOLOGY, 1941-1945 by Carter / Mueller, the Office of Air Force History,

Mission Reports

303BG Mission Report - Target: I.G. Farben Plant at Ludwigshafen, Germany. Crews Dispatched: 39 (358BS - 9, 359th - 10, 360th - 10, 427th - 10). Crews Lost: Lt. J.A. Newton, 7 KIA, 2 POW Crewmembers Lost or Wounded: Lt. Kiesel WIA. Bomb Load: 12 x 500 lb M43 bombs. Length of Mission: 7 hours, 50 minutes. Ammo Fired: 1,040 rounds.

Bombers successfully made their fourth successive attack on Ludwigshafen. In the target area there were 6/10 low clouds with tops ranging from 12,000 to 15,000 ft., and dense, persistent contrails. The Combat Wing received no report on the weather from the scouting force. Due to these conditions, bombing was done by PFF. The lead B-17 PFF equipment was out, so the deputy leader took over.

The Group formation saw no enemy aircraft and the escorting 140 P-51s provided excellent support. Flak, however, was intense and very accurate over the target and chaff had little, if any, beneficial effect. Meager to moderate flak was also encountered at Heidelberg, Germersheim, Luxembourg and Arlon. It was generally accurate. Thirty-five aircraft dropped 420 500-lb. G.P. M43 bombs.

Fortress #43-38323 (No Name), 427BS , piloted by 1Lt. John A. Newton, received a direct flak hit in the cockpit and another on the No. 1 engine. The entire nose section, left wing and No. 1 engine fell off. A burst of flame came out of the nose as it descended out of control. One man was seen to come out of the nose just after the B-17 was hit. He was followed down by observers in other aircraft to 12,000 ft., when he became lost in the clouds. No parachutes were seen. The Fortress crashed near Ludwigshafen.

More info on this mission at the 303BG website

source: 303rd Bomb Group web page http://www.303rdbg.com/
351BG Mission Report - 36 aircraft were sent on this mission. source: 351st Bomb Group web page http://www.351st.org/ken.harbour
384BG Mission Report - 384th BG Mission Number 190. The 384th Bombardment Group (H) formed the "B" Wing of the 41st Combat Bombardment Wing for today's mission. The primary target was a chemicals plant near Ludwigshafen, Germany. A visual attack was planned but a 10/10ths undercast required the Group to bomb using PFF aiming. Primary Target: Chemical Works - Ludwigshaven, Germany. Target Attacked : Primary (PFF).

41 aircraft assigned to this mission: Completed Mission - 35. Aborted - 2. Scrubbed - 1. Spare, Returned As Briefed - 1. Landed In Allied Territory - 1. Ground Spare, Unused - 1
42-31484 Wismer, Richard G - Aborted due to #1 supercharger out, oxygen leak and #1 oil line broken.
42-39888 Plowman, Noel E
42-97510 Salley, Thomas R - Dropped eight bombs on target; four after target (equipment malfunction).
42-102601 Hartness, Joseph G - Landed in allied territory. Aircraft left formation on return near Luxemburg due to battle damage; crash-landed in allied territory in France, specific location not identified in Group documents; salvaged.
43-37843 Cornair, Russell J - Bombs not released; bomb bay doors could not be opened.

source: 384th Bomb Group web page http://384thBombGroup.com/
388BG Mission Report - On this day the 1st and 2nd Air Divisions were sent to attack Mannheim and Gustaysburg while the 388th furnished 26 a /c for the lead and low Groups of the 45th A Combat Wing. All forces of the 3rd Air Division were dispatched to Dusseldorf with the exception of the 4th Combat Wing which dropped supplies to the French Marquis in France.

Our 24 a/c plus 2 PFF a/c took-off between 0700 and 0725 hours. Formations were effected and the briefed route to the target was followed. Cloud coverage prevailed over the target and it was attacked by PFF methods. Bombs were away at 1029 hours from 25,900 feet.

Moderate accurate flak was encountered at the target. All of our a/c returned to base safely by 1346 hours.

1944-09-10

source: 388th Bomb Group web page http://www.388bg.info
392nd Bomb Group Mission Reportsource: 392nd Bomb Group web page http://www.b24.net/missions/
398th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 398th Bomb Group web page http://www.398th.org/
401BG / 613BS Mission Report - Because of 9/10ths clouds over the target bombs were dropped on the PFF lead and results were unobserved. No enemy air opposition was encountered but the flak over the target was moderate to intense and accurate. Our eight crews which flew in the High Box and returned to base were: Coleman, Hanson, Ketter, Nelson, Eteters, Budd, Thomas, Hillested.source: 613th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 614BS Mission Report - The primary target was the same one that had been attacked on the previous two missions but with orders that if visual bombing could not be carried out the secondary target at Mannheim was to be attacked by PFF. The group furnished 39 aircraft to form the 94th "A" CBW with two PFF aircraft and a spare. The Air Commander was Lt. Col. Brown with Major H.C. Garland as the Low Box Leader. The flak was moderate to intense.The intensity of the flak can be gauged by the fact that of 1,042 aircraft over the target 14 were shot down and 449 received battle damage. The returning aircraft also brought back seven dead crewmen and 13 wounded. Crwes: 42-97780 Carroll, 42-107084 Harasym, 42-102659 Kovach, 42-97145 Lerwick, 42-97872 Bright, 42-31863 Utter, 42-38236 Hayes, 42-97478 Sisson, 42-97869 Crozier, 42-97602 Brown.source: 614th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 615BS Mission Report - The briefing for the Mannheim mission was at 0400 hrs for 39 crews, three observer crews and one weather ship crew. The weather ship, SC-H, was away by 0627 hrs and the 42 other B-17's were all airborne by 0816 hrs. The weather ship completed its run to the coast and landed back at Deenethorpe at 0920 hrs. The assigned target was the chemical works of the Mannheim plant of the I.G. Farben Industries, the specific target being the synthe~ic oil plant containing the hydrogenation stalls used in jet propelled and rocket bombs, but due to bad weather PFF bombing was carried out on the marshalling yards at Mannheim. The results were unobserved. The 401st furnished the aircraft making up the 94th "A" CBW with Colonel H.E. Rogner as the Air Commander flying with a 615th crew piloted by 1st Lt. D.R. Charleville. The flak over the target was moderate to intense and accounted for the veteran crew of 1st Lt. David Loughlin, flying their 31st mission. The aircraft was SC-G, Serial No. 42-97982 and was last seen dropping behind the formation. The ten 615th crews on the mission were: Grimm, Charleville, Callaway, Stegemann, Cooper, Haskell, Sombart, Daves, Sullivan, Udy.source: 615th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 612BS Mission Report - Lt. Loughlin and crew aircraft did not have as much time as the other two for it had a fire located around the radio room after a hit by Flak the fire spread quickly when they left formation. The aircraft remained intact until it reached 18,000 through 15,000 feet below and partially under control at which time it exploded. Although some of the crew, at least four, were seen to leave the aircraft it is not knOwn that all got out. This was most dishearting for the crew was on its 31st trip and slated to finish their tour with a couple more trips.source: 612th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 612BS Mission Report - After three days of inactivity September 9th found the Group with an assignment for a repeat performance at the Chemical Works at Ludwigshaven if visual bombing was possible and if not a PIT HBI across the river in the built-up area of Mannheim. The 401st furnished 36 aircraft comprising the 94th "A" CBW with two PFF aircraft included. The 10/10th undercast still precluded visual bombing and the Group bombed the PFF target and the Hickey Operators report a good bomb run and believed the results were geed. No P.R.U.. coverage has come to confirm this. Crews reported experiencing moderate to intense Flak at the target which continued to be good for accuracy. Although no enemy opposition was met the Flak accounted for the loss of one of the 612th crews. This was the crew of Lt. Loughlin which was flying its 31st mission. All other crews and personnel returned safely although 18 of the aircraft received battle damage. Nine of the 612th crews started the mission with eight returning. Crews: 42-97962 Loughlin, 42-106992 Schaunaman, 42-31087 Ludeman, 43-37632, Hocking, 42-102398 Maxwell, 42-97487 Aiken, 42-102393 Knost, 43-37790 Bonney, 42-107039 Harlan.source: 612th Bombardment Squadron History
44BG Mission Report - The early morning briefing for Ulm M/Y was scrubbed, but we did get the second one off to Mainz Marshalling Yards. 33 A/C (9 67th) and two PFFs were dispatched in lead of the "B" Wing of the 14th Combat Wing. 22 A/C and both PFFs attacked the primary, while the high squadron of 11 ships, after being forced off its bomb run by the 467th BG, went on to attack the Worms M/Y with that formation. Results of our bombing were unobserved. No E/A were observed and flak encountered was moderate to intense and accurate. Fighter support was excellent throughout the mission and all our aircraft returned safely. The 9 A/C of the 67th flew in the second section which was led by Lt. Bakalo. Lt. Steele did not take off due to mechanical malfunction. The remaining 8 planes, together with 2 from the 68th Squadron, after being forced off our bomb run' by the 467th, went on with them to attack Worms, utilizing PFF method, results unobserved. Six of the 67th ships sustained slight flak damage and returned at 1400 hours. Lt. Al Jones adds: "Our ship will be Q+ Glory Bee, loaded with 12 x 500 GPs. We will be trying to bomb the rail yards and supply dumps to aid General Patton. Lots of barrage flak from Frankfurt to Mainz. A ship ahead of us received a direct hit, taking the whole tail assembly off at the waist position. Parachute flak also is sent up. It has a can of explosives under it and floats through the formation. We flew at 10,000 feet over Belgium and France. Had a P-51 escort so close I could see what the pilot looked like.source: 44th Bomb Group web page http://www.8thairforce.com/44thbg
445BG Mission Report - Target: Mainz, Germany - Koblenz, Germany - Railroad Marshaling Yard - Any military target identified as German. A/C Took Off: 40. A/C Bombed Target: 30 / 6. A/C Lost: 0source: 445th Bomb Group http://445bg.org
457th Bomb Group Mission Linksource: 457 Bomb Group http://www.457thbombgroup.org
458th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 458th Bomb Group web page http://www.458bg.com/
467th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 467th Bomb Group web page http://www.467bg.com/
486th Bomb Group Flimsy reportsource: 486th Bomb Group web page http://www.486th.org/
91st BG / 322nd BS Mission Report - Again the I. G. Farben plant at Ludwigshaven was the target for the 1st C CBW furnished by this group. The 322nd Squadron furnished 9 A/C but only one crew, with Lt. Reichert as pilot. Bombing was done by PFF methods with unobserved results. Moderate to intense flak at the target resulted in the loss of 1 A/C from the formation. source: 322rd Bomb Squadron / 91BG Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report - Target: Ludwigshafen Synthetic oil plant. In spite of the rough reception at Ludwigshafen yesterday, our A/C returned today and again experienced accurate flak. Results unobserved on PFF. Our A/C 594 last seen at 1117 hours had been hit by flak and went into a flat spin with #4 engine on fire. It blew up at cloud level. Two chutes seen. No E/A opposition. Fighter support was good.source: 91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/

Non-Combat Accident Reports

Aircraft: AT-6D (#41-34619).
Organization: / 364FG of Honington, Suffolk.
Pilot: Boyd, Warren D.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Hixon England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-31878).
Organization: 412BS / 95BG of Horham, Suffolk.
Pilot: Layl, Billie B.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Horham, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-38110).
Organization: 407BS / 92BG of Podington, Bedforshire.
Pilot: Wallace, Harold (NMI).
Notes: landing accident.
Location: RAF Little Rissington England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#42-39909W).
Organization: 731BS / 452BG of Deopham Green, Norfolk.
Pilot: Walkup, Edwon F.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Deopham Green, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24H (#42-95291).
Organization: 703BS / 445BG of Tibenham, Norfolk.
Pilot: Porter, Keith W.
Notes: mid air collision.
Location: Leiston, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 2
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24H (#42-95308).
Organization: 701BS / 445BG of Tibenham, Norfolk.
Pilot: Morris, Floyd C.
Notes: mid air collision.
Location: RAF Woodbridge England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24J (#44-10489).
Organization: 852BS / 491BG of North Pickenham, Norfolk.
Pilot: Warczak, John S.
Notes: killed in crash landing.
Location: Brodney/ 1 1/2mi SW England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: Mosquito XVI (#MM391).
Organization: 653BSR / 25BGR of Watton, Norfolk.
Pilot: Noble, John P.
Notes: crashed belly landing.
Location: Watton, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-38J (#42-67261).
Organization: 436FS / 479FG of Wattisham, Suffolk.
Pilot: Dunn, Donald P.
Notes: ground accident.
Location: Wattisham, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-25512).
Organization: 62FS / 56FG of Boxted, Essex.
Pilot: Edwards, Trevor A.
Notes: take off accident.
Location: Boxted, Essex England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-7970W).
Organization: 551FTS / 495FTG of Atcham, Shropshire.
Pilot: Clarke, Donald L.
Notes: crashed belly landing due to engine failure or fire.
Location: Atcham, Shropshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51B (#43-6862W).
Organization: 555FTS / 496FTG of Goxhill, Lincolnshire.
Pilot: Booth, Billy B.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Goxhill, Lincolnshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51B (#43-7000W).
Organization: 555FTS / 496FTG of Goxhill, Lincolnshire.
Pilot: Hargrove, Jasper E.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Goxhill, Lincolnshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51C (#43-25044W).
Organization: 555FTS / 496FTG of Goxhill, Lincolnshire.
Pilot: Hergert, Thomas M.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Goxhill, Lincolnshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D10 (#44-14405).
Organization: 435FS / 479FG of Wattisham, Suffolk.
Pilot: Ford, Everett P.
Notes: killed in a crash.
Location: Lavenham/ 1mi NW England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D5 (#44-13369).
Organization: 357FS / 355FG of Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: Engelbreit, Joseph C.
Notes: take off accident due to engine failure.
Location: Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/

Mission Stats (Targets, Aircraft, Casualties, etc.)

Mission "8th AF Fighter Command"
Escort for 8th AF 613; Fighter-Bomber ops; Sweep
September 09, 1944

Primary source for mission statistics: Mighty Eighth War Diary by Roger A. Freeman
 
Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
71467737.89-0-35-1-29-2-170-1-74FG baled sea
361FG crash-lands Liege
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Mission Targets

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Escort
311 A/C

Sweep
44 A/C

Fighter-Bomber
196 A/C
Aircraft Groups

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
20FG
352FG
356FG
359FG
364FG
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
4FG
56FG
361FG
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
55FG
78FG
339FG
353FG
357FG
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
Aircraft Losses

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
356FG (3 a/c)
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
4FG (1 a/c)
56FG (3 a/c)
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
55FG (1 a/c)
78FG (1 a/c)
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)