Mission

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Narrative - Official Air Force Mission Description

Mission 533: 824 bombers and 675 fighters are dispatched to strategic targets (aircraft and tank factories, airfields and fuel depots) in SE Germany; weather deteriorated enroute and many bombers were recalled when confronted with a front rising to 28,000-feet (8,534 m) and most units attacked targets of opportunity; only 25 bombers hit their primary (Sindelfingen); 18 bombers and 3 fighters are lost; targets were (numbers in parenthesis indicate number of bombers bombing):

1. Of 359 B-17s, 103 hit Pirmasens; 56 hit Elsenborn, 41 hit Karlsruhe, 30 hit Ulm, 8 hit Spreicher and marshaling yards at Saarbrucken (34) and Luxembourg (29); they claim 1-1-1 Luftwaffe aircraft; 11 B-17s are lost, 1 is damaged beyond repair and 157 damaged; 1 airman is KIA, 5 WIA and 96 MIA. Escort is provided by 243 P-47s and P-52s; they claim 33-0-10 aircraft in the air and 24-0-15 on the ground; 1 P-47 and 1 P-51 are lost (pilots are MIA); 2 P-47s and 5 P-51s are damaged beyond repair.

2. Of 218 B-17s, 16 hit Aacen, 12 hit Eindhoven, 12 hit St Vith marshaling yard and 7 hit targets of opportunity; 3 B-17s are lost, 1 is damaged beyond repair and 94 are damaged; 5 airman are WIA and 18 MIA. Escort is provided by 162 P-47s and P-51s without loss.

3. Of 247 B-24s, 147 hit Saarbrucken marshaling yard and 25 hit an aircraft engine plant at Sindelfingen; 4 B-24s are lost, 2 are damaged beyond repair and 126 damaged; 1 airman is KIA, 10 WIA and 39 MIA. Escort is provided by 165 P-38s, P-47s and P-51s; they claim 6-0-4 aircraft; 1 P-38 is lost (pilot is MIA).

Mission 535: 3 of 4 B-17s fly a Micro H test mission against Aubigny, France airstrip. Escort is provided by 16 P-38s without loss. Mission 536: 6 of 6 B-17s drop leaflets in France and the Netherlands during the night.

116 P-47s, escorted by 40 P-51s, are dispatched on fighter-bomber missions against communications in France without loss.

In England, HQ 325th Photographic Wing (Reconnaissance) is activated at High Wycombe; and HQ 25th Bombardment Group (Reconnaissance) and 652d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy, Weather Reconnaissance) with B-24s, the 653d Bombardment Squadron (Light, Weather Reconnaissance) with B-24s and Mosquito XVIs and 654th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy, Reconnaissance, Special) with B-24s, B-26s and Mosquito XVIs are activated at Watton.

Source: THE ARMY AIR FORCES IN WORLD WAR II: COMBAT CHRONOLOGY, 1941-1945 by Carter / Mueller, the Office of Air Force History,

Mission Reports

303BG Mission Report - Target: Boot and Shoe Factory, Pirmasens, Germany. Crews Dispatched: 41 (358BS - 9, 359th - 12, 360th - 10, 427th - 10). Length of Mission: 6 hours, 50 minutes. Bomb Load: 10 x 500 lb M76 & 10 x 500 lb M17 Incendiary bombs. Bombing Altitudes: 20,200, 18,700 & 17,000 ft. Ammo Fired: 200 rounds.

Thirty-nine 303rd BG(H) B-17s, plus two PFF aircraft, took off to attack an aircraft engine plant at Allach, near Munich, Germany. Military installations at Augsburg were the target if PFF bombing was required. The secondary target was the Lechfield airfield, with various other German locations as the last resort targets. In addition, three 303rd BG(H) aircraft flew in the high flight, high Group of the 41 CBW-B formation with its primary target the air depot and airfield at Erding, Germany.

No 303rd BG(H) aircraft returned early on this deep penetration mission. In the target area there were 4/10 to 5/10 cirrus clouds with bases at 21,000 ft. and 3/10 to 4/10 cumulus clouds with 4,000 to 8,000 ft. tops. Air-to-ground visibility was limited to six to eight miles due to haze and dense, persistent contrails. These conditions made it unrealistic to consider bombing the primary target. The lead bombardier, Lt. Bowen, stated, "We 'bowed our neck' and went through it." Forty-one Fortresses dropped 376 500-lb. M76 incendiary bombs and 30 500-lb. M17 incendiary bombs on Pirmasens with good results.

Only two enemy ME-109s were seen, but they did not attack the 303rd BG(H) formations. Moderate and accurate flak was encountered in the Aachen-Liege- Maastruck area, meager and accurate fire at Lindhoven, and scattered fire at other points. Two aircraft had major and four, minor damage. Friendly fighter support was good. There were no casualties and all B- 17s returned safely to Molesworth.

More info on this mission at the 303BG website

source: 303rd Bomb Group web page http://www.303rdbg.com/
306BG Mission Reportsource: 306th Bombardment Group website www.306bg.org/
351BG Mission Report - 25 aircraft were sent on this mission.

42-107216 Lt. J. A. Myl - Ditched after flak damage. MIA 2.

44-6077 Lt. A. J. Zotollo - Shot down by flak. POW 9, EVD 3.

source: 351st Bomb Group web page http://www.351st.org/ken.harbour
384BG Mission Report - 384th BG Mission Number 176. Primary Target: Industry - Erding, Germany

35 aircraft assigned to this mission: Completed Mission - 30. Aborted - 2. Scrubbed - 2. Ground Spare, Unused - 1
42-37788 Proctor, John R - Aborted HC; turned back having lost the formation
42-97960 Allred, Frank L
42-102500 Pranger, Nicholas Vincent - Aborted Turned back due to serious illness; replaced crewman but could not catch up with formation, so returned 10x500GP to base

source: 384th Bomb Group web page http://384thBombGroup.com/
388BG Mission Report - The 8th Air Force dispatched all of its heavy bombers to attack targets in Southeastern Germany.

The 388th furnished one Group. They flew lead in the 45th A Combat wing formation. 18 a/c plus 2 PFF a/c were airborne by 0840 hours. 3 a/c aborted for mechanical reasons with the remaining a/c forming in their respective formations and proceeded to the target as briefed. As the formation crossed from Holland into Germany, it encountered a front with clouds from 17,000 to 30,000 feet. The Wing Leader made two 360 degree turns in an attempt to get under the clouds, but being unable to do so, turned back in the vicinity of Masstricht at 1025 hours.

Very accurate flak was encountered from Leige and Aachen. The Group received a lot of battle damage with three a/c receiving major damage.

No target was bombed and the bombs were returned. All of our a/c returned to base by 1216 hours.

source: 388th Bomb Group web page http://www.388bg.info
392nd Bomb Group Mission Reportsource: 392nd Bomb Group web page http://www.b24.net/missions/
398th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 398th Bomb Group web page http://www.398th.org/
401BG / 613BS Mission Report - Due to weather conditions over the continent a recall was received before the briefed target at Munich was reached. The target of opportunity selected by the wing Leader was the marshalling yards at Luxembourg. Bombed with excellent results. No air opposition was encountered and the flak at the target was nil. Only meager to moderate Flak was encountered along the route and all aircraft returned safely. Crews participating were : Shackleford, Connolly, Lippert, Cain, Jetter, Kuta, Thomason.source: 613th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 612BS Mission Report - Mission number 126 for the Group was planned as an the important aircraft engine factory on the outskirts of Munich. This mission was scheduled for August 9th, the 401st furnishing the Lead and Low Boxes for the 94th "A" CBW. Bad weather fronts in Germany necessitated the Primary target being abandoned and the Group turned around and enroute back to the base bombed the Marshalling Yards at Luxembourg, obtaining excellent results. No enemy air opposition was met but two aircraft sustained minor damage from flak encountered near. Aachen and Antwerp which was meager and fairly accurate. All crews returned unharmed.source: 612th Bombardment Squadron History
401BG / 614BS Mission Report - Lt. C.C. Lincoln led the Low Box to bomb the airfield at Munich. Heavy clouds up to 25,000 feet and dense contrails made it impossible to keep the formation together, so a target of opportunity was selected and the Squadron struck the marshalling yards at Luxembourg with excellent results. No enemy aircraft were encountered and the flak was scattered, meager but fairly accurate.27 aircraft of the 401st took part in this mission with Lt. Col. Seawell as Air Commander and Wing Leader. Crews: 42-31081 Lincoln, 42-97145 Carroll, 42-31863 Hayes, 42-107151 Silverstein, 42-97478 Finney, 42-97602 Rozzell.source: 614th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
401BG / 615BS Mission Report - 27 operational crews and one weather ship crew were briefed at 0330 hrs and were given two operational plans - Plan "A" and Plan "B". At 0600 hrs Wing Operations advised that Plan "A" was to be put into action. This meant that the weather ship was recalled by Wing Operations. All aircraft were airborne by 0742hrs. This mission was briefed for another target but due to a weather front up to 25,000 feet through which the Wing were flying, it was decided to select a target of opportunity - Luxembourg marshalling yards. Bombing results were described as excellent with a concentration of hits on the choke points near the roundhouses. The 401st Group furnished two 12 aircraft Boxes comprising the 94th "B" CBW, of which Lt. Col. W.T. Seawell was Wing Leader, flying with Capt. F.A. Kalinski. The Wing Navigator was Lt. Eaton and the Wing Bombardier was Lt. Minott. Capt. Lincoln led the Low Box. No enemy air opposition was met but meagre to moderate flak was encountered along the route. Two aircraft received minor battle damage. Fighter support was good throughout the entire mission. The 615th loading list was as follows: Kalinski, Calloway, Cooper, Wingard, Mitchell.source: 615th Bombardment Squadron History www.401bg.org
44BG Mission Report - Sindelfingen, Germany was the Primary target for the Group for the 22 aircraft and 2 PFFs dispatched (8 67th's) but the formation had to turn back 50 miles west of the target because of adverse weather conditions. However, 17 A/C and both PFFs bombed the briefed secondary at Saarbrucken with excellent results and no losses. Six of the 67th were among those that bombed. The briefed AP and MPI were completely covered with bomb smoke and haze and the SAVs indicated excellent results. Also, Capt. Craig in A/C #660 (PFF) led the 445th BG, bombing with unobserved results.- No enemy fighter action, but flak was heavy and accurate. Friendly fighters joined the formation after crossing in, furnishing excellent close support. Several of the Group's returning ships suffered flak damage. The 68th alone had three "AC" one "B" and one "A". And they also had two men wounded: S/Sgt. D.R. Hill and 2nd Lt. Fred B. Schuyler, co-pilot, who was severely injured and later was evacuated to the U.S.source: 44th Bomb Group web page http://www.8thairforce.com/44thbg
467th Bomb Group Mission reportsource: 467th Bomb Group web page http://www.467bg.com/
486th Bomb Group Flimsy reportsource: 486th Bomb Group web page http://www.486th.org/
91st BG / 323nd BS Mission Report - Camp Elsenborn, Belgium, was successfully bombed. Thirteen 323rd ships participated. All ships and personnel returned safely. Ship #7276 aborted. At an altitude of 14,000 Ft., No. 2 prop ran away. The pilot tried to change it by use of pitch control, but it only made it more and R.P.M. stuck at 2500 R.P.M. with throttle completely back. In losing altitude, prop ran up to 3,000 R.P.M.; engine ran extremely rough and vibrated, so he feathered engine and returned to base. source: 323rd Bomb Squadron / 91BG Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
91st BG / 322nd BS Mission Report - Elsenborn, Belgium. The 322nd Squadron put up 11 A/C of the high group 1st B CBW. Due to the weather it was not possible to bomb either the visual or PFF primary targets, but on the return the military camp at Elsenborn, Belgium, was bombed with excellent results by the lead and low groups. Seven A/C of the high group jettisoned their bombs and four brought their bomb loads back. source: 322rd Bomb Squadron / 91BG Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report - Target: BMW aero engine factory 7 miles NW of Munich. This Group furnished the 1st B CBW. High cloud caused the high group to become separated from the lead and low groups at point of turn back, approximately 0800 E where the Division commander decided to abandon operation against the primary target ( 7 mi. N.W. of Munich ). Low and lead groups bombed Elsenborn barracks with good results. Eight A/C of the high group jettisoned in the vicinity of 5040 N - 0600 E from 1025 to 1140 hours. One A/C bombed with the 381st Group reported to be Saarbrucken M/Y. Four A/C brought bombs back. A/A fire was accurate and caused damage.source: 91st BG / 324th BS Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/
91BG / 401BS Mission Report - On the 9th of August we dispatched 10 A/C and 12 crews to attack the Center of the city of Munich with instruments. Due to weather, target at Elsenborn, Belgium was attacked with good results. PFF A/C 632 and 754 were furnished by the 324th Squadron. Maj. Lord flew as Act. Cmdr. In A/C 643. We flew the lead Group. No flak was encountered over the target but accurate fire was experienced immediately afterward. None 324th A/C are missing.source: 91st BG / 401st BS Mission Report http://www.91stbombgroup.com/

Non-Combat Accident Reports

Aircraft: B-17G (#42-38140).
Organization: 412BS / 95BG of Horham, Suffolk.
Pilot: Severson, Donald J.
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Horham, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#43-37981).
Organization: 838BS / 487BG of Lavenham, Suffolk.
Pilot: Stone, Donald T.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Lavenham, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-17G (#44-6114).
Organization: 838BS / 487BG of Lavenham, Suffolk.
Pilot: Booth, Raymond W W.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Lavenham, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 4
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24H (#42-95163).
Organization: 754BS / 458BG of Horsham St. Faith, Norfolk.
Pilot: Hess, Glenn A.
Notes: crash landing.
Location: Horsham St. Faith, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: B-24J (#42-50726).
Organization: 567BS / 389BG of Hethel, Norfolk.
Pilot: Faris, Robert E.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Hethel, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-47D (#42-8503).
Organization: 350FS / 353FG of Raydon, Suffolk.
Pilot: Davis, Lonnie M.
Notes: take off accident.
Location: Raydon, Suffolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51B (#43-12460).
Organization: 555FTS / 496FTG of Goxhill, Lincolnshire.
Pilot: Clemmons, Billy (NMI).
Notes: taxiing accident.
Location: Goxhill, Lincolnshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51C (#42-102998).
Organization: 555FTS / 496FTG of Goxhill, Lincolnshire.
Pilot: Courtney, David H.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Goxhill, Lincolnshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D5 (#44-13329).
Organization: 503FS / 339FG of Fowlmere, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: Reynolds, Gardner R.
Notes: ground looped.
Location: Fowlmere, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D5 (#44-13659).
Organization: ESF / 355FG of Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire.
Pilot: Thomas, Earl N.
Notes: landing accident.
Location: Steeple Morden, Cambridgeshire England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: P-51D5 (#44-13926).
Organization: 375FS / 361FG of Bottisham, Cambrdigeshire.
Pilot: Dellinger, Donald D.
Notes: killed in a crash.
Location: Stalham/ 1/2mi W England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 5
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/
Aircraft: UC-64 (#43-35445).
Organization: Hq / of Hethel, Norfolk.
Pilot: Wambold, William H.
Notes: ground looped.
Location: Hethel, Norfolk England.
Damage (0-5 increasing damage): 3
source: Aviation Archaeology http://www.aviationarchaeology.com/

Mission Stats (Targets, Aircraft, Casualties, etc.)

Mission "8th AF Fighter Command"
Escort for 8th AF 533, 8th AF 535, fighter bomber ops
August 09, 1944

Primary source for mission statistics: Mighty Eighth War Diary by Roger A. Freeman
 
Aircraft
Sent
Aircraft
Effective
Bomb TonnageEnemy
Aircraft
X-P-D
Enemy
Aircraft
(on gnd)
X-P-D
USAAF
Aircraft
X-E-D
USAAF
Personnel
KIA-WIA-MIA
Notes
8477350.039-0-1424-0-153-7-00-0-3
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Mission Targets

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Escort
586 A/C

Fighter-Bomber
149 A/C
Aircraft Groups

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
20FG
352FG
356FG
359FG
364FG
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
4FG
56FG
355FG
361FG
479FG
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
55FG
78FG
339FG
353FG
357FG
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)
Aircraft Losses

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1ST BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
356FG (1 a/c)
364FG (1 a/c)
2ND BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
479FG (1 a/c)
3RD BOMBARDMENT DIVISION
OTHER (IX AF, HQ, etc)